Advocacy

Update on Implementation of Impact Fees

(Development Charges)

BOMA’s recent advocacy efforts on the issue of potential impact fees in Winnipeg have resulted in an amending motion for Executive Policy Committee.

We are pleased that the amending motion recommends a phased-in approach to impact fees, and that commercial, office, industrial and institutional developments will be exempt from any fee for two years. We’re also pleased to see that residential infill development in existing neighbourhoods (including downtown) will be exempt from impact fees for three years.

BOMA looks forward to contributing to the City’s working group to advise on the three-year phase-in process, as well as advise on reasonable fee values for all asset classes.

Amending Motion on Impact Fees

Amending Motion on Impact Fees – Backgrounder

EPC Amending Motion on Impact Fees

Terms of Reference – Impact Fee Working Group

Impact Fee Implementation Map

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Implementation of Impact Fees (Development Charges)

To view the written submission from BOMA Manitoba to the Executive Policy Committee of the City of Winnipeg regarding Impact Fees, please click here.

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Comprehensive Fee Review

On March 23, 2016 City Council adopted the results of a Comprehensive Fee Review (CFR) that adjusts all fees charged for various permits and services. These changes (with the exception of commercial mechanical permit fees) come into effect on June 1, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

Fee changes for Commercial Property Owners

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Adoption of the National Energy Code (Manitoba Energy Code for Buildings)

On December 1, 2014, the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings became effective in Manitoba.  These new efficiency standards apply to the construction of new buildings and additions governed under Part 3 of the Manitoba Building Code.

For more information, please click here.

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Managing Asbestos in Buildings

A friendly reminder to BOMA member firms about their responsibilities regarding asbestos management.  Although the current legislation pertaining to asbestos management in buildings was introduced in 2006, we wanted to ensure that members still have access to all of the necessary information that will help them meet the provincial government requirements.

The Workplace Safety and Health Act and Part 37 of the Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Regulation, M.R. 217/2006 require specific actions  when a potential health hazard is present in the workplace.

For information on creating an asbestos inventory, how and what to communicate to building occupants, and what’s required for staff training, please click on the links below.

http://www.gov.mb.ca/labour/safety/pdf/faqs_asbestos_contain_material.pdf

https://digitalcollection.gov.mb.ca/awweb/pdfopener?smd=1&did=15988&md=1

http://winnipegsafetycompanies.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Manitoba-Asbestos-Abatement-Guidelines-2016.pdf

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BOMA Position Paper:

Infrastructure and its Impact on the Commercial Real Estate Industry

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BOMA Position Paper:

National Environmental Statement of Principles for the Commercial Real Estate Industry

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BOMA Office Building Classification Guide

Background:

The discussion on the need for clarification on office building classification originated within the BOMA Quebec Property Management Committee whose mission is to find new ways to improve BOMA’s service offer to its members.  In the Fall of 2012 a multidisciplinary working group composed of experts from various Quebec-based real estate firms was formed to study this issue in depth.  The main objective of this task force of real estate owners, brokers and appraisers was to come up with an office building classification framework that could eventually be published for the benefit of its local members.  The resulting Office Building Classification Guide was presented to the BOMA Canada Board of Directors for consideration.

BOMA Office Building Classification Guide Now Available!

What does a Class A Building mean? What are the differences between Class A, B and C buildings? When looking for new office space, a tenant will quickly realize most buildings are classified in one of those three categories. The factors that determine a building’s class vary in each market, so a Class A office building in a major urban city will be much different than a Class A office building in a small rural town of 30,000 people. There are no definitive formulas used to classify a building, but a general definition for each class is provided in the new BOMA Office Building Classification Guide.

BOMA Building Classification Guide (English)

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BOMA Stance on e-Cigarettes

For more information on what e-Cigarettes are and why they may be a concern, please view the following article, developed by BOMA Ottawa and BOMA Canada here